Country Club New Bedford

Millennial Pushing the Envelope on the Course

Screen Shot 2017-09-06 at 12.25.36 PM

Changing The Game of Golf

We all grow up being told not to stereotype, but it’s human nature to pair certain qualities with certain groups.

Some may be true; some may not be. One thing golf does have is a very strong stereotype among non golfers around the world.

Rich. Snobby. Proper. No fun. Quiet please.

Those are some of the words that some people associate with golfers. 

Rich people who enjoy their weekends at their country club, wearing fancy clothes, only clapping and not cheering and being quiet for most of their four-hour round.

But the millennial golfer may be breaking that mold. Myself included, millennial golfers like to push the envelope.

Instead of wearing a proper polo, we like to wear polos with crazy patterns and colors, untucked with a backwards hat on.

We are still going to hit the golf ball the same.

We like to bring our Bluetooth speakers and play our favorite songs while we play with our friends. We like to prank each other and try trick shots. Golf is a game, lets make it fun.

With all that being said we respect the history and tradition of golf, but with the direction it is heading, we need a drastic change to get todays youth excited and involved.

What better than bright fun clothes, loud music, competition and a whole lot of fun. The older generation may see our loud music as disrespect.

Come on dude, you were going to shank that ball into the woods even if my 50 Cent wasn’t blasting on my speaker. Golf needs to lighten up.

Until the older generation gets their ego and pettiness out, this game may never grow.

Millennials are not trying to ruin golf, we are trying to put our own fun spin on it.

Either join us, or get left in the dust. This is the future of golf.

Is It Wrong To Play Music On The Golf Course?

Quiet, Please? 

The development of Bluetooth has created the luxury of having a speaker virtually anywhere.

And anywhere includes on the golf course.

But old John Miller at your country club thinks it is completely ridiculous and against golf etiquette to do so.

So the question is, is it okay for millennials to play music on the course?

Yes, but there is a time and a place.

Bluetooth Speaker

There is a certain area of the course where it is cool. Don’t be the guy blasting music next to the starter booth while the group in front of you is teeing off. Anywhere near the clubhouse should really be a “no music” zone. Be respectful of the first tee box and 18th green.

Once you’re a little deeper into the course, turn it up and enjoy yourself. The big thing is just being aware of where you are. Obviously if you’re pulling up to the green blasting AC/DC and the group is on the next tee box, you may tick off old man Miller.

It really comes down to time and place. It is like talking in elementary school. Be respectful of your peers, wait till it is right and when you do it, do it respectfully. Music is becoming more and more of who we are as people. And with things like Spotify and Apple Music, you can access pretty much every song ever made.

The problem with that is song choice. The slim chance the groups around you can hear your music, you don’t want people to complain about the music.

So be smart about your music, the safest bet is always classic rock, country or todays hits. Eminem, Ludacris or Five Finger Death Punch probably aren’t the best artists to blast on the fairway.

Music is a great way of entertainment and to add some fun into your round. I mean even Jordan Spieth and his, now famous, spring break group was playing music when they hit the fairways on their vacation. So don’t be afraid to charge up your speaker for your next round and play some jams while you shoot in the 100’s.

days

hrs

mins

secs

Email Address